MOSS Saves The World

#1

At The MOSS Jam ’06 the crew raised enough money for a 10,000 litre water tank for a poor community in Swaziland.

Before these people had a water tank, babies were dying of water born diseases from being fed formula made with dirty bore water. Girls had to walk up to 5 miles to get that dirty water from the only bore in the area. The water comes out of the bore slowly, so they had to queue up for the water and then carry it back home. Just collecting water took them so long that there was no time for school.

Now the government will fill up the tank with clean water. They would have supplied water before, but there was nowhere to store it.
(For those that don’t know, “MOSS” or Melbourne Old School Skate Sessions is a group of middle-aged skateboarders. Every year an Old School Skate “Jam” is held at a different skate bowl in Melbourne. Old School Skateboarders come from all over Australia for a weekend of celebration of their mid-life crisis, reminiscing, music, fun and skateboarding.)
For more photos like this one of Billy Harrison, check out
www.charliedontskate.com -> Forum -> So hot right now -> M.O.S.S. JAM 06

Commemorative Hoodie.

#2

Here’s some pics of before the water tank was installed…

Waiting for a turn to fetch water

Single water source for 800 households

Carrying water back home

Here’s the water tank.

Question; Where is Swaziland.
Answer; Southern Africa. Here’s a link with some info… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swaziland

#3

Damn fine work Reginald. Now I know why I paid the registration fee without actually riding (aside from the hoodie which I am wearing right now).

MOSS good karma must be at a max!

#4

Here’s some info I got from Swaziland before the tank was installed.

This story came form Sister Maureen.

[i]Tiny Philiswa Maziya is a patient on the Pediatric Ward at Good Shepherd Hospital. Philiswa was born 3 months ago weighing a little over seven pounds. Since that time both her parent have died of AIDS and she has been chronically ill. A loving and attentive Gogo (grandmother) now cares for her, a not uncommon experience in a country where 56% of women in the 25-29 year age group are HIV+. Gogo Maziya and her family are part of the 77% rural based population in Swaziland depending on rivers and unprotected wells as the main source of household water, the cause of Philiswa’s chronic and increasingly life-threatening illness.

Because breast milk is not available to her, Philiswa has been fed from unsterilized bottles, using milk powder, which has been over diluted with unsafe water. She has had diarrhea for many days. On Feb.13 she is admitted with severe malnutrition, wasting and dehydration, weighing 4.8 pounds, a significant drop from her birth weight. Children under four years of age must have a caretaker with them at all times, so Gogo Maziya must now leave the rest of the family to attend to Philiswa in the hospital.

An IV drip is inserted to replace needed fluids, and because the baby is so weak that she cannot feed adequately on her own, a feeding tube is placed. Gogo Maziya learns to measure the milk mixture into a clean cup and dilute it with boiled water. Using a clean syringe she carefully inserts the milk with added micronutrients through the feeding tube in the hopes of coaxing this little one back to health. Gogo has learned to do this from Dr. Joyce Mareverwa, a pediatrician from Zimbabwe. Before Dr. Joyce came, GSH had no pediatrician. Since her arrival she has filled the pediatric ward with critically ill children – TB, malaria, HIV/AIDS, wasting and malnutrition. Because she is African herself, Dr… Joyce knows well these diseases. She has gained the affection of her young patients and the confidence of their caretakers. Dr. Joyce nurtures and nourishes many of these children back to life with her heart as much as with her medical knowledge. Now she turns her attention to Philiswa and the difficult work of saving her life

In Swaziland, only 33% of the rural population has access to a clean water supply. This lack of potable water is the chief cause of the high rate of infant mortality in the country from diarrhea, malnutrition and infectious diseases. Gogo Maziya and her family are part of this statistic. They live in a homestead in the Makehewu Community, an area not far from the hospital. There are over 800 households there, each family living in a one room, thatched roof house, without electricity or running water. There is only one water source for the community, which must serve them for bathing, cooking, drinking, laundry and crop irrigation. Women and girls spend an inordinate amount of time fetching water, often walking 3-5 miles, collecting it in large containers, which are then transported home in wheelbarrows or carried on their heads. It is from this water source that Philiswa was fed

Every year 1.8 million people die from diarrheal diseases, 90% of them children under the age of 5. I begin to worry for Philiswa. She has done well the first 5 days after admission, raising her weight from 2.2 to 2.8 kilograms. On Feb. 19, day 6 of admission, however, she has started having diarrhea again and has begun to lose weight. Despite the feeding and medication, the diarrhea continues. The next day, Feb. 21, I am shocked at the rapid change in her little body. . She is now severely dehydrated, clearly in distress. The soft spot on the top of her head is sunken in from lack of fluid, and her little heart is racing madly in an attempt to meet the demands of her stressed body. Gogo Maziya does her best to comfort Philiswa, but she too is feeling the urgency of the situation and her concern is evident.

On Feb. 22, as I make my daily visit, I see Gogo gently rocking the fragile little body in her arms. The feeding tube has been removed from her nose and the IV drip from her tiny arm. For the first time she looks like just a baby. And I realize that even Dr. Joyce, with her medical magic and caring heart, could not keep Philiswa from becoming one of the 1.8 million lost to this preventable disease. I have read that it would take the equivalent of 1% of the world’s military expenditure to provide safe water and decent sanitation facilities for all human beings. How do we measure a life?

I sit on the bed with Gogo Maziya for a while, not saying much, our shoulders touching. She asks me if she can have some of the photos I’ve taken of Philiswa, and I say yes, I will send them to her. Her grief is deep but restrained. She is a strong woman. She has buried her children; now she will bury her grandchildren. I look at the still, small body, still swathed in blankets and words of Isaiah, which I happened upon, come to mind:

	In my pastures the poor shall eat
	   and the needy lie down in safety.

Rest peacefully, Philiswa.
You are safe now, little one. You are safe.[/i]

Philiswa on admission

Philiswa with Gogo in the Peds Ward

Dr. Joyce exams Philiswa

Philiswa the day before she died

#5

Here’s a thank you to MOSS from one of the volunteers that was on the ground in Swaziland. She has now returned to the USA after a tour of duty in Swaziland….

[i]Siyabonga Kakhulu (Thank you very much) for your generous contribution to the orphans and vulnerable children of Swaziland-in particular, the Moyeni Neighborhood Care Point. The Care Point began as a dream between a few motivated community members cooking World Food Program donations out of their own private kitchen. Thanks to your assistance, it is now a solid community focal point where adults and orphans
can receive informal education and their only meal per day. Your contribution has helped to provide water for the hundreds of adults and orphans/vulnerable children that come to the care point daily for food
and water. The water tank you provided has helped with the cooking, building and simple drinking water of the care point. More importantly though, you’ve given the 300+ suffering individuals who utilize the
Care Point hope-something no money can buy and so rare in such a destitute situation. Thank you for inspiring me and giving these orphans a chance at life. We all sincerely appreciate your efforts.
I have attached a few pictures of the Moyeni Neighborhood Care Point as
water tank for your enjoyment!

Siyabonga Kakhulu (Thank You Very Much)
& Salani Kahle (Stay Well),
Jacquelyn Marie Eisenberg
United States Peace Corps Volunteer, Swaziland[/i]

Here’s a shot of the Moyeni Neighbourhood Care Point during construction.

#6

And here’s a thank you from the guy in Melbourne who helped get the money through. He actually spent 6 months in Swaziland and returned to Oz early this year.

[i]Dear Friends,
On behalf of all those involved in the organisation and building of the Moyeni Neighbourhood Care Point for orphans and Vulnerable Children in Swaziland, Southern Africa, I would like to extend my deepest gratitude for your kind donation of a 10,000 litre water tank.
The Care Point at Moyeni serves children who have been orphaned by AIDS as well as men and women suffering from HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.
Swaziland is a country with the highest prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the world - 42%. It also has the highest proportion of orphaned children in the world with 10% of the entire population being orphaned children.
These kids are among the most under privileged of all human beings in that often they have absolutely no one to look after them. The Water tank that you have sponsored at Moyeni will supply water for up to 5000 people in the community in addition to the orphans and sick people who visit the carepoint.
People (often little orphaned children) will walk every day for up to 4 kms to gain access to the water this tank provides. They will collect their water and then return to their homes.
The challenges facing Swaziland and Southern Africa are huge. However when good hearted people such as yourselves reach out in compassion to address the needs of these beautiful people, it gives me great hope that we can make a difference.
On behalf of the people of Swaziland, thank you once again for your generous contribution,
Siabonga Kahkuhlu (thank you very much),
With my very best wishes,
Maithri Goonetilleke.

“We must be the change we wish to see in the world” - Mahathma Gandhi"
[/i]

#7

Thanks to everyone that helped with the MOSS Jam. Without their support the water tank would not have happened.

Special thanks must go to Nik Filips from Darebin City Council and Gerry Byrne from Aspire / Banyule City Council who took a risk on trusting the MOSS Crew and allowed the MOSS Jam to proceed under the Council’s insurance cover. The money MOSS saved on insurance went straight to the purchase of the water tank.

Our generous sponsors also need a big thank you for providing the products that were sold to raise the money. So thanks to:-
Independent Truck Co.
Luke Signs
And
Southern Cross Confectionery.

Thanks also to these sponsors that provided prizes for the Jam:-
Kwala
Charlie Don’t Skate
Fallen Footwear

Thanks to everyone that bought a MOSS Jam hoodie.
Your $30 went straight to Swaziland.

And last but not least, thanks to these people that put in time and effort to make The MOSS Jam ’06 a success.
Some worked on the BBQ, others worked the microphone, or took away the rubbish, collected the money, printed the signs, mixed the music or just organised stuff.
Thanks to all these people.

Aaron Cornall
Andrew McKenzie
Barnaby Lawrenson
Barney Wilson
Billy Harrison
Brad Hooker
Braden Schlager
Bret ‘One-T’ Connelly
Bruce Fairley
Cam Wells
Carey Hazelbank
Chris Hatten
Darren Lacey
Darren Montague
Dianna Valladares
Dr Bill Schaffer
Graham Edwards
Jimi Hocking
Jimmy Loricco
Leah Marshall
Mark Kent
Marty Kent
Matthew Grant
Michael Markham
Northcote Plaza Manager
Rohan Lancaster
Sean Andriesz
Steve Welch
Susie Andriesz
Vanessa Valladares
Vivienne Mole

#8

If all that makes you feel all warm inside, think about this….

Five thousand people sharing a 10,000 litre water tank works out to 2 litres each.
MOSS has not saved the world, just helped out a very small part of it.

So if you’re holding a Jam and want free insurance, tell the council it’s a fund raiser and send the money to someone who really needs it.

If anyone out there wants to know more or wants to help out this worth cause just drop me a line.

#9

Wedge, reading all that leaves me happy, angry, and sad. Speechless. That tank is the raddest pipe-like structure on this or any other site.

Fox, you KNOW what SOS MUST DO!!! (please put it on the agenda for next meeting).

#10

A Job well done boys and Girls you make proud to be part of our skate community. Docs’ right Fox this is a must for our Jam 8)

#11

Sir Reginald,

A lot of the “behind the scenes” work was done by you kind sir. Without your commitment and work ethic to the cause, the MOSS jam would not have been what is was.

Everyone else who helped out did play an important part in the bigger picture and deserve their thanks as well.

#12

Love your work MOSSers! Bloody well done.

I hope you can somehow get a pic with a MOSS sticker on the tank.

See you all at SOS.

#13

Nice work Wedge - MOSS jam left a good legacy.

#14

:smiley: MOSS :smiley:

#15

You guys were great hosts. Pleased to see $ went somewhere vital. We’ll be back next year, probably with families along for a short holiday.
Newcastle Traditionalist Mike.

#16

INCREDIBLE OUTCOME of a fun day.
Onya Robert & Bret.

#17

MOSS Jam 07 Charity Auction.

At the MOSS Jam 07 After Party…
Frankston Cricket Club
Just across the oval from Frankston Skate Park
Olive Grove, Frankston. Melway 102 E2
6:30pm until 1am. Saturday 17th March 2007.

Last year’s Jam bought this water tank for Swaziland.

Auctions:
Collectables Charity Auction.
Funds go to the Swaziland Water Project.
Bring your cash.
Donate your collectables for the auction.

Post up your donated items on the MOSS Jam 07 thread.
charliedontskate.com Forum Index -> Skatejams -> MOSS Jam '07

Bidding starts now and the hammer falls on Saturday night.

A signed Jeff Grosso Emergency Black Label deck is up for grabs.
(Thanks Charlie).
A Skip Engblom signed deck is also a maybe for the auction.
Goliath is rumoured to be donating a Madrid complete worth $300+
A Xxxxxxx deck signed by Aussie Sk8 legend Xxx Xxxxx
Also shoes and photos have been promised by Xxx Xxxxx.
(Sorry to get Xie, but it’s a secret).

Entertainment:
Video wall.
BYO Old Skate DVD’s.
BYO CD’s
Wobbly John is bringing machines from his arcade…
Think Soccer Table, Bowling and Pinball.
All takings go to charity.

Food: Hot Chips, Hot Roast Beef Rolls. (Yep, spit roasted on site.)
Drinks: Beer on tap, etc. Yeah it has a bar.
Prices: Cricket Club Prices (Cheap).
Kids: Welcome.

Amenities:
Hot showers to wash away those nasty odours and slams.
This place is basic, but then aren’t we?

Presentations:
Trophies & Prizes galore on this night.
(Fossil & Grommet presentations during the Jam)

Roll free,

#18

MOSS Jam 07 Charity Auction.

At the MOSS Jam 07 After Party…
Frankston Cricket Club
Just across the oval from Frankston Skate Park
Olive Grove, Frankston. Melway 102 E2
6:30pm until 1am. Saturday 17th March 2007.

Last year’s Jam bought this water tank for Swaziland.

Auctions:
Collectables Charity Auction.
Funds go to the Swaziland Water Project.
Bring your cash.
Donate your collectables for the auction.

Post up your donated items on the MOSS Jam 07 thread.
charliedontskate.com Forum Index -> Skatejams -> MOSS Jam '07

Bidding starts now and the hammer falls on Saturday night.

A signed Jeff Grosso Emergency Black Label deck is up for grabs.
(Thanks Charlie).
A Skip Engblom signed deck is also a maybe for the auction.
Goliath is rumoured to be donating a Madrid complete worth $300+
A Xxxxxxx deck signed by Aussie Sk8 legend Xxx Xxxxx
Also shoes and photos have been promised by Xxx Xxxxx.
(Sorry to get Xie, but it’s a secret).

Entertainment:
Video wall.
BYO Old Skate DVD’s.
BYO CD’s
Wobbly John is bringing machines from his arcade…
Think Soccer Table, Bowling and Pinball.
All takings go to charity.

Food: Hot Chips, Hot Roast Beef Rolls. (Yep, spit roasted on site.)
Drinks: Beer on tap, etc. Yeah it has a bar.
Prices: Cricket Club Prices (Cheap).
Kids: Welcome.

Amenities:
Hot showers to wash away those nasty odours and slams.
This place is basic, but then aren’t we?

Presentations:
Trophies & Prizes galore on this night.
(Fossil & Grommet presentations during the Jam)

Roll free,

#19

It’s taken a long while, but work is finally under way on the water project at Luhhumani Primary School in north western Swaziland. (Emailing volunteers and transfering funds to a place like Swaziland can be a challenge). There are no photos yet, but I’ll post 'em up when they come.

69 of the 200 kids at this school are orphans. Many live in child lead households, which can mean their only meal for the day may be the one they get at school.
The water project will provide water to the veggie garden where the school grows food to feed the kids. The water project may also make flush toilets a possibility. This is important not only for hygeine, but to help attract and retain teachers to this remote community. If anyone wants more detail let me know.

The MOSS Jam 2008 project could be to fund a 2km 40mm pipe to supply water to 50 homesteads in Swaziland. Stay tuned.

Thank you to every one that parted with a dollar at the MOSS Jam '07.
Your dollars are doing good work for some of the poorest people on earth.

Roll free,

#20

Thats awsome Wedge, good on ya dood,Who would have thought 20/30 years ago that a bunch of smelly skate punks could/would have made such a difference.Big thumbs up to everyone.I’m in this year.

cheers joe

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